About Us

Policies

Disciplinary Policies
At aos Waldorf School, we believe that children have a right to a quality education in a safe and caring environment. Our discipline policy starts with the adults of the school and our commitment to work on ourselves and to treat each other and the children in our care with respect. We want to provide children – and adults – with the opportunity to learn from our mistakes and to develop over time an inner-sense of what is right in the moment. Our goal is to create a healthy learning environment by fostering respect for self and others, by providing clear expectations and boundaries and by promoting problem-solving skills among our students. For more detailed information please click the following links:
      • General Discipline Policy

Dress Code
  aos Waldorf School recognizes that all students have intrinsic worth based on who they are and not on what they wear. We want to create an environment in which each student can develop those innate qualities, focus on learning, and contribute in a positive way to the school community. We also believe that pressures related to clothing choice can distract students and undermine the school environment. The dress code adopted by the school encourages self-discipline and is simple to manage. Styles must not interfere with the educational process nor present a safety hazard as determined by the faculty. Disregard for any of these standards will result in the student not being allowed into class and parents/guardian and/or emergency contacts being contacted to pick up student and/or bring an appropriate change of clothes. See the School Handbook for details.

Media & Screen Viewing Policy
The violence, consumerism and passive entertainment that are taken for granted in today‟s mass-media culture do not support the well being of children. The cumulative effect of repeated exposure to television, video games, movies, radio and computers can negatively impact a child’s development. At Desert Marigold, we strongly encourage parents to take full responsibility for determining the type and extent of screen viewing (video games, game-boy, x-box, computers, etc.), and media exposure (television and DVD) their children receive. Your child’s teachers will be providing information regarding media use and your child’s education and engaging you in a dialogue that we hope will be stimulating and rewarding. Our goal in doing so is to do our utmost to create a learning environment that is conducive to active, imaginative learning. See the School Handbook for details.

Our recommended guidelines regarding media use are as follows:
1. For children in preschool and kindergarten: None, or as little as possible.
2. For children in grades 1 – 3: No television, video games, computers or movies during the school week; minimal parent-directed media use on weekends and during vacations.
3. For students in grades 4 – 8: No television or video games or computers in the morning before school; minimal parent-directed media use during the school week; parental involvement in determining appropriate media and computer-use choices at all other times.
4. For high school students: Parental involvement in determining media and computer-use choices.

Articles
American Academy of Pediatrics
Mayo Clinic

Recommended Waldorf Reading List

School as a Journey. An experienced Waldorf class teacher describes his experience taking a class from Grade One to Grade Eight. By Torin Finser.

School Renewal. Describes the personal and organization challenges that often face people working together in the Waldorf school environment. By Torin Finser.

Waldorf Education – A Family Guide. A lively selection of many articles on
curriculum, festivals, parenting and much more.

Stop Teaching Our Kids to Kill: a Call to Action Against TV, Movies & Video
Game Violence.
The title says it all. By Lt. Col. Dave Grossman.

Vision in Action – Working with Soul & Spirit in Small Organizations. Offers
great insight into the stages of development of organizations like ours. By Christopher Schaefer and Tyno Voors.

Republican Academies – Rudolf Steiner on self-management, experiential study and self-education in the life of a college of teachers. A compelling look at Steiner’s perspective that how teachers work together in a school is as important as how they teach in the classroom. By Francis Gladstone.